This boldly characterized bird is surrounded head to tail in magnificently displaying red and black and is understood for his uproarious nature

A brightly colored, boisterous flycatcher with a contrasting yellow belly and a black-masked head.

The great kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus), also known as bem-te-vi in Brazil, is a passerine bird in the Tyrannidae family.

This boldly characterized bird is surrounded head to tail in magnificently displaying red and black and is understood for his uproarious nature

Great Kiskadees measure 22 cm and weigh 63g.

The head is black with a prominent white eyestripe and a hidden yellow crown stripe.

The upper body is brown, and the wings and tail are brown with rufous fringes. The black bill is thick and short.

The Boat-billed Flycatcher, which is similar, has a massive black bill, an olive-brown back, and very little rufous in the tail and wings.

It is found primarily in Belize, as well as in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of southern Texas and northern Mexico.

This boldly characterized bird is surrounded head to tail in magnificently displaying red and black and is understood for his uproarious nature

Occurs throughout Brazil and Venezuela (particularly in the central and south-southeastern regions), south to Argentina and Uruguay, Paraguay and central Argentina, the Guyana coast, and on Trinidad.

It was first introduced to Bermuda in 1957, and Tobago around 1970.

The great kiskadee prefers open woodland with tall trees, as well as cultivation and human habitation.

They hunt like a shrike or flycatcher, sallying out from an open perch high in a tree to catch insects on the wing or descending on rodents or other small prey.

This boldly characterized bird is surrounded head to tail in magnificently displaying red and black and is understood for his uproarious nature

They will also eat fruit and dive for fish in shallow water on occasion (making them one of the few fish-eating passerines).

Because of their opportunistic feeding habits, they are among the most common birds in Latin American cities.

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