Social by name and social by nature this talkative birds bright yellow vest pops into prominence once you hear them

This gregarious by name, social by personality bird stands out even more with a brilliant blend of canary yellow, white, and olive-brown!

The sociable flycatcher (Myiozetetes similis) is an American passerine bird that belongs to the giant tyrant flycatcher group (Tyrannidae).

Social by name and social by nature this talkative birds bright yellow vest pops into prominence once you hear them

They resemble a little variant of the Boat-billed Flycatcher, Megarynchus pitangua.

Adults are 16-18 cm in length and weigh 24-27 grams.

The head is dark gray with a prominent white eye stripe and a hidden orange crown stripe.

The top portions are olive-brown, while the wings as well as tail appear brown with rufous fringes.

Its pubescent are yellow, with a white neck. Young birds have such a paler eye patch, a narrower crown stripe, and chestnut fringes on their wing but also tail feathers.

Social by name and social by nature this talkative birds bright yellow vest pops into prominence once you hear them

It is frequently divided into two species: the sociable flycatcher, Myiozetetes texensis, which ranges from Costa Rica to Mexico.

And the vermilion-crowned flycatcher, M. Similis proper, which ranges from southwest Costa Rica to South America.

Plantation owners, open grassland with some trees, and extensive woodland are all good places for social flycatchers to breed.

These chatty birds like to rest openly on trees, many meters above the ground, in couples or small groups.

Furthermore, they will sally out for long distances from such perches to grab insects in flight.

They also frequently hover and glean for prey and tiny berries, such as those found in gumbo-limbo (Bursera simaruba).

Social by name and social by nature this talkative birds bright yellow vest pops into prominence once you hear them

Not only that, but they will also pick up prey from the ground and may even enter shallow waterways to feed on benthic organisms, tadpoles, and small fish.

The female constructs a big roofed house of stems and straw in a shrub, tree, or on a building, which is commonly erected near a hornet, bee, or ant nest, or the nest of another tyrant flycatcher, for safety.

The nesting place is frequently near or above water. Between February and June, a typical clutch consists of two to four brown- or deep purple cream or white eggs.

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