His body of glowing gold is finished off with a distinctive black throat highly compelling appearance

Streak-backed Orioles are 7.87 inches (200 mm) long (including the tail), have a wingspan of 3.54 – 4.65 inches (90 – 118 grams), and weigh 2.47 – 3.00 oz (70 – 85 grams).

His body of glowing gold is finished off with a distinctive black throat highly compelling appearance

Males are larger than females in general.

Subspecies of “New World Blackbirds: The Icterids” are classified into three groups.

What distinguishes this species is that the males in the northern range are brightly colored, whereas the females are generally dull.

As one moves south, the female plumages gradually brighten until, at the southern end of their range, the females resemble the males.

Females with more vibrant colors are also more active in territorial defenses than their duller northern counterparts.

This bird is native to Central America and Mexico, and it comes to the United States on occasion.

His body of glowing gold is finished off with a distinctive black throat highly compelling appearance

They are most common in open woodlands and semi-arid shrublands.

They prefer open woodlands with thorny Mimosa shrubs in the undergrowth in much of their range.

When Mimosa is not present, they appear to prefer areas with other thorny bush species.

The streak-backed oriole primarily feeds on insects and spiders, but it will also consume fruits, berries, seeds, and nectar.

Seasonally, streak-backed orioles are monogamous (remaining with one mate for the entire breeding season).

They typically breed once a year, with most nesting activity beginning in mid to late spring and ending in mid to late summer. There are some differences between the various areas.

His body of glowing gold is finished off with a distinctive black throat highly compelling appearance

The female builds the nest by herself out of plant fibers in the shape of a long hanging basket (about 28 inches or 70 cm in length).

These nests are attached to the branches’ tips.

The average clutch contains 3–4 eggs that are incubated for 12–14 days before hatching.

The young stay in the nest for about two weeks before they fly, and are cared for by both parents.

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