A sweet with luminous ball of pink plus orange and blue is combined to perfection to create an unbelievably cute bird

The Oriental dwarf kingfisher (Ceyx erithaca) is the most colorful and smallest of the kingfisher species, reaching just 5 – 5.5 inches (13 – 14 cm) in length — including bill and tail.

Weighing just about 0.5 oz (14 g). This bird is distinguished by its vivid blue crown and a violet wash along the sides of its normally orange head.

A sweet with luminous ball of pink plus orange and blue is combined to perfection to create an unbelievably cute bird

The top half of the body is bluish-black with shiny blue lines.

The neck is white, with vivid orange lines running through the center.

The under body plumage is an eye-catching orange-yellow.

Males and females have nearly similar appearances, but youngsters are often less colorful.

These birds are found over most of Southeast Asia, South China, and the Indian Subcontinent.

A sweet with luminous ball of pink plus orange and blue is combined to perfection to create an unbelievably cute bird

Oriental dwarf kingfishers tend to live along little streams in heavily forested lowland woods.

The Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher, like other kingfisher species, hunts from a perch.

However, instead of fish (the kingfisher’s traditional diet), it mostly feeds on insects, as well as tiny lizards or frogs when the opportunity comes.

It kills lizards and frogs before eating them by holding them in its beak and repeatedly beating them against a stone or tree stump.

The Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher develops in southern India in June, coinciding with the arrival of the Southwest Monsoon.

Their breeding season in other locations lasts from October to November.

A sweet with luminous ball of pink plus orange and blue is combined to perfection to create an unbelievably cute bird

Males and females both make nests by digging a horizontal tunnel or burrow up to a meter long on a bank.

This tube leads to a chamber where they lay a brood of 3 to 6 eggs, which have been incubated for roughly 17 days by both the male and female.

When the young are around 20 days old, they fledge (leave the nest). If the initial nesting effort fails, a second brood may be reared.

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