A shiny collection of lemon-yellow – orange and red combine’s spectacularly well with a rather rakish

You have just witnessed the lovely Cedar Waxwing. Hundreds of Cedar Waxwings congregate in the fall to eat berries.

Filling the chilly air with thin, shrill whistles.

A shiny collection of lemon-yellow - orange and red combine’s spectacularly well with a rather rakish

During the summer, you may see using their amazing aeronautical abilities to flutter around hunting insects above rivers.

You are more likely to hear a Cedar Waxwing before you see one, so if you learn their cry.

You may track them down to berry bushes or evergreens near lakes, rivers, and ponds.

The Cedar Waxwing is one of the few North American birds that eats fruit exclusively.

And can live for at least many months on fruit alone.

A shiny collection of lemon-yellow - orange and red combine’s spectacularly well with a rather rakish

In truth, if Cedar Waxwings in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada consume enough honeysuckle fruit, their tail feathers will become orange rather of yellow.

They can become inebriated on occasion if the berries they consume grow overripe and begin to ferment, creating alcohol.

A female Cedar Waxwing can take up to 5 to 6 days to build a nest, which may need up to 2,500 individual journeys.

Saving time can be accomplished by taking material from other robin, King bird, and Yellow Warbler nests.

It goes without saying that Cedar Waxwings enjoy fruit.

A shiny collection of lemon-yellow - orange and red combine’s spectacularly well with a rather rakish

So plant some native trees and shrubs that grow tiny fruits if you want to attract them to your yard.

Consider planting dogwood, cedar, juniper, or cedar.

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